Breastfeeding FYI

Cesarean Births and Breastfeeding

More than 23 percent of births in the U.S. are Cesarean, and the rate is rising. Many European and South American countries have even higher rates. Thus, the effects of Cesareans on breastfeeding has been extensively studied. As a result, breastfeeding rates and duration are shown to be about the…

Delaying Solids Until Six Months

There are many reasons for delaying the introduction of solids until the middle of baby's first year. Most of these were mentioned in a previous FYI. However, I'd like to expound upon some of these: Decreased risk of developing allergies. Early introduction has been linked with allergic reactions such as…

Determining Baby's Readiness for Solids

Human milk is nature’s complete food for at least the first six months in a healthy, full-term infant. After that point, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization believe solids may help meet baby’s growing needs for iron, protein, and calories. Baby’s readiness for solids usually become apparent…

Engorgement...A Medical Emergency

Breast fullness after birth is considered normal. However, severe breast swelling, redness, shiny skin, warmth, throbbing, pains, low grade fever and flattening of the nipple are symptoms of engorgement. In fact, engorgement is now considered a medical emergency. Early intervention is necessary to decrease the chance of mastitis and the…

Excessive Weight and Its Possible Effects on Breastfeeding

Considering mom’s weight as having a possible effect on breastfeeding appears, at first, to be an extreme idea. However, some issues could indeed play a role in the success of breastfeeding for the overweight mom. Understanding these issues can help caregivers give additional support and education.Issues to consider include: The…

Expressed Breast Milk and the Hospital Setting

There has been some question as to whether expressed breast milk should be considered a hazardous material and be placed in “biohazard bags.” The last OSHA statement does not consider breast milk to be “an other potentially infectious material” – even though other body fluids such as blood, saliva, semen,…

Flame-Retardant Chemical...Found in Breast Milk!

New research has stated that high levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been found in the breast milk of American women. This flame-retardant chemical is widely used in furniture cushions, plastic encasements of computers and electronics, and fabrics. Several studies have promoted the ban of several types of PBDEs,…

Hospital Practices Related to Breastfeeding Failure

The nutritional benefits of breastfeeding to infants are well documented. In fact, support of breastfeeding includes: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life, with continued breastfeeding for at least one year. The World Health Organization (WHO), which recommends exclusive breastfeeding…

Hyperthyroidism and Breastfeeding

Excessive thyroid hormone is characterized by loss of weight (despite an increased appetite), nervousness, heart palpitations and a rapid pulse at rest. It can put strain on the heart, muscles, and nervous system. Hyperthyroidism can develop for the first time postpartum and the ability to lactate does not appear to…

Hypothyroidism and Breastfeeding

As many know, hormonal changes during pregnancy and postpartum can cause thyroid levels to temporarily (sometimes permanently) increase or decrease, even in moms who have never had thyroid irregularities. Underactive thyroid (hypothyroid) often causes fatigue, poor appetite, dry skin, thinning of hair, and depression. These symptoms are often “blamed” on…
Page 2 of 5